Moth

Generic placeholder image

Blastobasidae

Blastobasidae


Blastobasidae are a family of moths in the superfamily Gelechioidea. Its species can be found almost anywhere in the world, though in some places they are not native but introduced by humans.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Bombycidae

Bombycidae


The best-known species is Bombyx mori (Linnaeus) or silkworm,


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Cosmopterigidae

Cosmopterigidae


These are small moths with narrow wings whose tiny larvae feed internally on the leaves, seeds, stems, etc. of their host plants. About 1500 species are described.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Crambidae

Crambidae


The Crambidae are the grass moth family of lepidopterans.the nominal subfamily Crambinae (grass moths) taking up closely folded postures on grass stems where they are inconspicuous, while other subfamilies include brightly coloured and patterned.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Drepanidae

Drepanidae


Drepanidae is a family of moths with about 660 species described worldwide.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Erebidae

Erebidae


The Erebidae are a family of moths in the superfamily Noctuoidea. The coloration of the adults spans the full range of dull, drab, and camouflaged. Some of the erebid moths are called owlets.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Eupterotidae

Eupterotidae


Eupterotidae is a family of insects in the order Lepidoptera with more than 300 described species.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Euteliidae

Euteliidae


Euteliid Moths


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Gelechiidae

Gelechiidae


These are generally very small moths with narrow, fringed wings. The larvae of most species feed internally on various parts of their host plants.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Geometridae

Geometridae


A very large family, it has around 23,000 species of moths described,Their scientific name derives from the Ancient Greek geo γη or γαια "the earth" and metron μέτρων "measure" in reference to the way their larvae, or inchworms.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Lecithoceridae

Lecithoceridae


Long-horned moths


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Noctuidae

Noctuidae


It was considered the largest family in Lepidoptera for a long time, but after regrouping Lymantriinae, Catocalinae and Calpinae within the family Erebidae. Noctuidae is the second largest family in Noctuoidea, with about 1,089 genera and 12,000sp.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Nolidae

Nolidae


They are mostly small with dull coloration, the main distinguishing feature being a silk cocoon with a vertical exit slit.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Notodontidae

Notodontidae


Species of this family tend to be heavy-bodied and long-winged, the wings held folded across the back of the body at rest. They rarely display any bright colours, usually being mainly grey or brown,


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Plutellidae

Plutellidae


Plutellidae are a family of moths commonly known as the diamondback moths.The head usually bears smooth scales and the antennae are often thickened in the middle. The wings are elongated and the hindwings often bear long fringes.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Pterophoridae

Pterophoridae


Pterophoridae or plume moths are a family of Lepidoptera with unusually modified wings.The forewings of plume moths usually consist of two curved spars with more or less bedraggled bristles trailing behind.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Pyralidae

Pyralidae


The Pyralidae, commonly called pyralid moths, snout moths or grass moths.The wingspans for small and medium-sized species are usually between 9 and 37 mm with variable morphological features.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Scythrididae

Scythrididae


Scythrididae (flower moths) is a family of small moths in the superfamily Gelechioidea.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Sesiidae

Sesiidae


The Sesiidae or clearwing moths are a diurnal moth family in the order Lepidoptera known for their Batesian mimicry in both appearance and behaviour of various Hymenoptera.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Sphingidae

Sphingidae


TTheir narrow wings and streamlined abdomens are adaptations for rapid flight.hey are moderate to large in size and are distinguished among moths for their rapid, sustained flying abilit.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Thyrididae

Thyrididae


Window-winged Moths


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Tineidae

Tineidae


They are known as fungus moths or tineid moths. The family contains considerably more than 3,000 species in more than 300 genera. Most of the tineid moths are small or medium-sized, with wings held roofwise over the body when at rest.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Tortricidae

Tortricidae


Adults feed on flowers, and lay eggs in flower heads.


View details »

Generic placeholder image

Uraniidae

Uraniidae


The family Uraniidae contains both diurnal and nocturnal species. The day-flying species are usually more strikingly colored and vibrant than the nocturnal ones. Many diurnal species also have iridescent scales and multiple tails.


View details »